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Dr Giacomo Capuzzo

Key Research Interests

•    Bronze Age and Iron Age transition in Europe
•    Urnfield culture
•    Radiocarbon dating
•    Bayesian analysis (OxCal modeling)
•    Geostatistical methods in archaeology and space-time analyses
•    Expansive phenomena in archaeology
•    Adoption of innovations and phenomena of cultural change
•    Demographic fluctuations, environmental changes and settlement patterns
•    Database design and management

Key Research Interests

•    Bronze Age and Iron Age transition in Europe
•    Urnfield culture
•    Radiocarbon dating
•    Bayesian analysis (OxCal modeling)
•    Geostatistical methods in archaeology and space-time analyses
•    Expansive phenomena in archaeology
•    Adoption of innovations and phenomena of cultural change
•    Demographic fluctuations, environmental changes and settlement patterns
•    Database design and management

Background

 

M.A. degree in Pre- Protohistoric Archaeology at the University of Padova, Italy
 

Ph.D. in Prehistoric Archaeology (archaeological sciences) at the Department of Prehistory, Autonomous University of Barcelona (Spain); co-tutelle thesis with the Department of Archaeology, University of Padova (Italy).

I am a postdoctoral researcher in the CRUMBEL multidisciplinary project at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). I undertook my Undergraduate degree and Master in Italy, at the University of Padova, where I focused on the North Italian Protohistory. Afterwards, I worked on my PhD thesis supervised by the Prof. Juan Antonio Barceló at the Autonomous University of Barcelona (Spain) founded by a FI grant co-financed with the European Social Fund “Space-Temporal analysis of radiocarbon evidence and associated archaeological record: from Danube to Ebro Rivers and from Bronze to Iron ages”. The main topic of my research is the geostatistical analysis of 14C-dated archaeological contexts located in Central Europe and the western Mediterranean during the Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age, period in which I am specialized. In particular, I have been focusing on the use of radiocarbon dates in order to reconstruct the behavior of past societies, providing thus information about phenomena like the adoption of innovation, the diffusion processes, the socio-cultural changes, the demographic fluctuations and the settlement patterns at a macro-scale. Since my B.A. degree I have been working on the study of cremation burials from Central and Southwestern Europe, a research topic in which I am particularly interested. During my studies I also acquired experience in database design and management, being the author of the EUBAR database (http://telearchaeology.org/EUBAR/) and working on the creation of the Iber-Crono database.

In the latter years, I have been an active member of three research groups: the Quantitative Archaeology Lab (LAQU), the research group G6 in the interdisciplinary research project “Social and environmental transitions: Simulating the past to understand human behaviour (SimulPast)”, funded by the Spanish Ministry for Science and Innovation, and the Research Group AGREST funded by the Catalan Government. As an archaeologist, I have participated in excavations in Italy, Spain and Israel, where I increased my expertise in 14C-dating both at the laboratory and at the field adopting a micro-archaeological approach for sampling at the sites of Tell es-Safi and Megiddo. In those sites I was also introduced to FTIR spectroscopy for mineral identification. I have also spent research periods as a visiting student in foreign centers, like the Department of Prehistory of the Natuhistorisches Museum in Vienna and the D-REAMS Radiocarbon Laboratory, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel). In this framework, I improved my skills into collaborating with different specialists such as archaeologists, physicists and mathematicians, highlighting the growing importance of quantitative approaches in arts, humanities and social sciences and thus the fluidity of interdisciplinary boundaries.

Main Publications

Capuzzo G, Barceló JA. 2015. Cultural changes in the 2nd millennium BC:  a Bayesian examination of radiocarbon evidence from Switzerland and Catalonia. World Archaeology 47 (4) Special Issue: Bayesian approaches to Prehistoric Chronologies:622-641.

Capuzzo G, Boaretto E, Barceló JA. 2014. EUBAR: a database of 14C measurements for the European Bronze Age. A Bayesian analysis of 14C-dated archaeological contexts from Northern Italy and Southern France. Radiocarbon 56 (2):851-869.

Barceló JA, Capuzzo G, Bogdanovic I. 2014. Modeling expansive phenomena in early complex societies: the transition from Bronze to Iron Age in Prehistoric Europe. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 21 (2):486-510.